Brexit – The Disunited Kingdom

Hello followers,

Following the dramatic result of the referendum in UK this morning, my husband and I have agreed that we have to ‘change’ course. Here, many underestimated the presence of EU-related connections in Cumbria and the ugly truth is that many businesses involved with EU companies are already advising their employees ‘to look elsewhere’. Cumbrian voters, probably disregarding this notion or future prospect, have voted en masse for the Leave camp. Apart from strictly political positions, the vote has seemed like shooting ourselves in the foot, at least in the ‘northern powerhouse’ (something that Copeland MP Jamie Reed didn’t fail to point out in his Post-Brexit speech https://jamiereed.net/2016/06/24/referendum-result-i-will-work-night-and-day-to-ensure-that-the-plans-for-our-area-continue-and-that-our-prosperity-is-secured-jamie-reed-mp/).

I was born in Italy. After being the subject of rude remarks directed at me from locals in the past two weeks, I am aware that now that Brexit happened that could be a pattern of behaviour likely to be repeated in the future. Both my husband and I now feel uneasy at the thought of staying in a country that 1) utterly hates my guts 2) it might be not even united in the next two years.

Therefore, having taken in all the events from this morning at 4 am, I can quietly declare that… it’s time to change, it’s time to stop and think where our future lies. I am pretty sure it is not here, although I am aware it also hurts a bit. I am in pain because I wanted ‘this relationship’ to work out. I felt at home in UK and I had never felt unwelcome before last month, and I know that this country has given me more than the one I was born in in a shorter time.

Why do I feel to leave then?

  1. Because I now feel an alien and a bit shocked at all the hatred and xenophobia spouted by a large majority of the British electorate.
  2. Because I am now surrounded by a gang of British Empire nostalgic Little Englanders who want to make ‘this’ country great. Whose country is this though? Theirs, have they bought it from Westminster? And ‘this’ country includes… whom, in it? Not Scottish or Irish people who have quickly disowned the leave vote and started thinking about secession from the United Kingdom the moment the results were out. ‘This’ country does NOT represent them anymore either.
  3. Because they will never admit they have fucked it up this much and they will rather commit suicide all together than admitting defeat or being wrong

This morning my own husband felt ashamed to be British-born, he felt ashamed to associate himself with ‘those’ people, whatever he wanted to say with ‘those’. Brexit has opened a divide in the UK, not only Europe. It has opened a divide between British people, British residents of any nationality, EU citizens and non-EU citizens. There’s a lot of uncertainty and arguing going on, everywhere, whilst the stock markets will plunge down like they never did in decades.

Will it heal? Maybe, in 20-30 years. But I know that I won’t be here to see it, nor do I care.

See you soon on these pages though,

Merlin xxxx

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Brexit – The Disunited Kingdom

  1. They close the door behind them. They took the freedom to their children to live and work in other countries. I always loved British people, I always loved Great Britain, but today I realized that they don’t love me. We’ll see.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Please don’t feel like you should leave. Please please know that there are more people who welcome anyone here than those ignorant enough to pass judgement on anyone different to them (even though they probably bring far more to this country than those who have got things so so wrong). Don’t judge us all and please don’t leave. Not for you, or us, or our children….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I really appreciate your kind comment! 🙂 Thanks a million. I am not saying that the majority of people are like that, but surely in some areas, where the austerity cuts have been unbearable for local communities, it has been easy to use ‘foreigners’ as a scapegoat. And this is quite evident in the North, although the immigrants are less than 2% of the population. They have bought into the xenophobic propaganda without even thinking the source of their problems is elsewhere. Unfortunately we live here, not in Scotland or in the South, so in a way or another we will have to leave what we have built here and move, even if only within the country.

      Like

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